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New ampCNG CNG Fueling Station is Open in Buda

Grand Opening Monday, April 23, 2018 from 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
AMP Americas’ new station is located at 1529 Turnersville Road in Buda, adjacent to US Foods, which will serve as the station’s anchor fleet.
One of the nation’s largest foodservice distributors, US Foods will fuel its Buda-based fleet of 50 CNG trucks at this station. These trucks will serve the Austin area and routes to Dallas and Houston.
The station is open for all CNG vehicles, and with two lanes for fueling, is specially designed to accommodate both light- and heavy-duty vehicles. Designed for ultra fast fill – a heavy duty tractor will typically fill in 8-10 minutes – there is ample turning room for vehicles and all major fleet and credit cards are accepted.

Nearly Half of All New Cars Sold In 2017 Achieved Fuel Economy Above 30 Miles per Gallon

U.S. Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) Fact of the Week #1015

In 2017, about 46% of all new cars achieved 30 miles per gallon (mpg) or higher while the number of cars exceeding 50 mpg rose to about 5%. For light trucks, almost two-thirds achieved fuel economy above 20 mpg and less than one percent fell below 15 mpg. By contrast, in 1975, about 88% of new cars achieved less than 20 mpg and about 7% got less than 10 mpg. For new light trucks in 1975, nearly all (97.5%) were under 20 mpg and about 28% were under 10 mpg. Over the 42-year period there have been many advances in engine technologies, transmission technologies, aerodynamics, tires, and high-strength lightweight materials that have increased efficiency of light vehicles.

*Data for 2017 are preliminary, based on projected production data from the automakers.

Notes: The definition of cars and light trucks is the same definition as in the Corporate Average Fuel Economy rulemaking. Thus, the car category includes cars, station wagons, and small 2-wheel drive sport utility vehicles (SUV). The light truck category includes pickups, vans, minivans, 4-wheel drive SUV, and large SUV. Fuel economy data are adjusted values that represent EPA’s best estimates of real world performance.

Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions, and Fuel Economy Trends: 1975 Through 2017, EPA-420-R-18-001, January 2018.

This post originally appeared on VTO’s Fact of the Week.

Don’t Kill the Electric Car, EV Rebate Program is Safe

Finally, we can declare with 100% certainty that the $7,500 federal electric vehicle (EV) tax credit is SAFE, and was not cut in the combined tax package legislation that Congress released on Friday.

Watch this short 30 second video from Plug In America:

Survey: Dallas Ranked Top NGV County in Texas

by Lauren Tyler

A survey conducted by the Texas Natural Gas Foundation (TXNG) has found that Dallas County, with 3,579 vehicles and 25 stations, is the top natural gas vehicle county in the state of Texas.

“As our survey indicates, Texas is making strides in replacing conventional fuels with natural gas,” says State Rep. and TXNG President Jason Isaac. “Texas has catapulted the United States to the largest producer of natural gas in the world. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, Texas holds more than one-fourth of the nation’s proved natural gas reserves.

“Natural gas currently supplies less than five percent of the total fuel used for transportation in the United States,” he continues. “We should encourage the use of Texas fuels, like natural gas, that help build our state’s roads and support our public education, while also growing our economy.”

There are currently 9,040 natural gas vehicles on Texas roads –  a 27% increase since August 2014. Planned additions by fleets, including VIA in San Antonio and Houston Metro, will soon swell that number to 10,084.

Further, refueling stations under development will add an additional 33 stations to the state’s current total of 86 public fueling stations and 67 private stations.

“In a recent study, idling diesel engines emitted five times as much harmful emissions as natural gas,” says Isaac. “Whether it’s your city’s garbage trucks or the 18-wheelers on the highways, natural gas trucks provide quiet, clean transportation that relies on our abundant, domestic natural resources.”

 

New Member: Renewable Energy Group, Inc.

LSCFA is proud to call Renewable Energy Group one of our new members, we look forward to forging new paths for renewable fuels in central Texas together.

Renewable Energy Group, Inc. (Nasdaq: REGI) is a leading provider of cleaner, lower carbon intensity products and services.  We are an international producer of biomass-based diesel, a developer of renewable chemicals and are North America’s largest producer of advanced biofuel.  REG utilizes an integrated procurement, distribution, and logistics network to convert natural fats, oils, greases, and sugars into lower carbon intensity products.  With 14 active biorefineries, a feedstock processing facility, research and development capabilities and a diverse and growing intellectual property portfolio, REG is committed to being a long-term leader in bio-based fuel and chemicals. Visit regi.com for more information.

What are state and local governments doing to incentivize alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs)?

There are many notable incentive activities at the state and local levels. Many states offer incentives for alternative fuels that advance specific environmental and energy security goals, while cities provide even more localized support.

 

States are targeting vehicles, infrastructure, and other means to encourage AFV adoption. Below are various types of incentives, as well as hyperlinked examples of each:

  • AFV Purchase Incentives: States offer grants, rebates, and tax credits for the purchase of AFVs. While some states may focus vehicle incentives on a particular fuel type, such as electric vehicles, others are more general in their support. States provide AFV purchase incentives to consumers, commercial fleets, and public fleets, such as schools and government agencies. Different incentive mechanisms tend to be more appropriate for different categories of vehicle purchasers; for example, grants are often limited to certain types of entities. Public fleets may not be liable for taxes, so they usually benefit more from grants than from tax credits. Private fleets can benefit from grants, rebates, and tax credits.
  • Fueling Infrastructure Purchase and Installation Incentives: Similar to AFV incentives, states provide grants,rebates, and tax credits for alternative fueling infrastructure. States usually create incentives for the physical fueling infrastructure, but many programs also support installation costs. Some states also offer a tax creditor tax reduction for the production or purchase of alternative fuel itself. Fueling infrastructure incentives may stipulate that the fueling or charging station must be available to the public, which helps to increase the availability of alternative fuels to a broader range of entities.
  • Other Incentives: In addition to financial support for the purchase of AFVs, states may give special benefits to AFV drivers. For example, some states allow high-occupancy vehicle lane access to AFVs, while others provide reduced registration fees, weight restriction exemptions, and emissions inspections exemptions.

 

Municipalities are also playing a role in supporting AFV deployment. Cities and counties incentivize AFVs in a number of ways, including by offering free or discounted parking, expediting permitting processes, and providing vehicle and infrastructure grants. For example, New Haven, CT, provides free parking on city streets for AFVs, while Los Angeles, CA, offers instant, online residential electric vehicle supply equipment permitting approval. The Alternative Fuels Data Center’s (AFDC) Local Laws and Incentives page provides more information on these and a greater array of other local options; while the page regarding local laws and incentives is not meant to be comprehensive, it provides users an idea of the different municipal programs and policies that exist (http://www.afdc.energy.gov/laws/local_examples). If you are aware of an innovative way that municipalities are supporting alternative fuels and vehicle acquisition, please contact the Clean Cities Technical Response Service attechnicalresponse@icf.com to share the details.

 

For more information about state and local alternative fuel incentives, see the AFDC Laws and Incentives page (http://www.afdc.energy.gov/laws).

 

Clean Cities Technical Response Service Team

technicalresponse@icf.com

800-254-6735

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